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Tombides loses battle with cancer

Written By kom limapulan on Jumat, 18 April 2014 | 23.46

Young Australian footballer Dylan Tombides, 20, has lost his battle with cancer, passing away on Friday morning in England.

Young Australian Dylan Tombides has lost his battle with cancer. Source: Supplied

YOUNG Australian footballer Dylan Tombides has lost his battle with cancer, passing away on Friday morning in England.

Tombides, 20, has battled testicular cancer for three years, after being diagnosed in 2011.

His club, West Ham, will honour him with a minute's applause ahead of its Premier League fixture with Crystal Palace on Saturday and the club's players will wear black armbands.

Tombides joined West Ham as a youth player in 2010, and made his senior debut for the Hammers in 2012 in the League Cup.

He represented Australia at under-17 and under-23 level, as recently as at the AFC under-22 championships earlier this year, and was long touted as a future Socceroo.

West Ham paid tribute to Tombides in a statement on Friday.

"Dylan's amazing resilience and positivity saw him through months of surgery and chemotherapy, while his outstanding talent saw him make his first-team debut in a League Cup tie with Wigan Athletic at the Boleyn Ground in September 2012."

"Away from the pitch, Dylan did a huge amount of work to raise awareness of male cancer, supporting the One for the Boys campaign at a number of high-profile events alongside the likes of Hollywood star Samuel L. Jackson, snooker star Jimmy White and fellow Australian Peter Andre.

"Dylan was respected by everyone who knew him for his intelligent views on the game and his larger than life character. He was a loving son, amazing brother and well-respected member of the West Ham squad. He will be hugely missed by everyone who had the honour of knowing him."

The FFA also paid their respects to the talented young star.

"On behalf of the Australian Football Community, we offer our deepest condolences to Dylan's family, team mates and friends during this extremely sad time," FFA chief executive David Gallop said.

"The Tombides family has lost a fine young man and Australian football has lost one of its most promising football players. He will be remembered for the courage he showed in his personal battle as much as the prodigious talent he displayed on the football field."

Leave your tributes to Dylan in the comments section below.


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NRL referees’ disgraceful record

North Queensland star Jonathan Thurston wasn't happy with the referees last night. Source: AAP

THE NRL's incompetent referees have managed to rob three teams of victory in just 12 days.

The disgraceful run of howlers started in Melbourne on April 6, when the Gold Coast Titans were awarded a matchwinning penalty in the final minute of play against the Storm.

HOWLER ONE: Melbourne vs. Gold Coast

Titans prop Luke Douglas dropped the ball cold in a three-man tackle, but officials Ben Cummins and Brett Suttor ruled that it had been stripped out.

"I know it's a Storm crowd, but I think most people would be reasonably upset with that penalty," Melbourne coach Craig Bellamy said after the match. He doesn't usually have such a talent for understatement.

It hasn't been all bad for the Storm though. Bellamy's players benefited from another ridiculous error five days ago, when they were allowed to play on after full-time to steal victory from the Dragons. This time, the lead referee was Matt Cecchin.

HOWLER TWO: Melbourne vs. St George Illawarra

"Technically, the siren sounded a split second before the Melbourne player 'heeled' the ball. So, in that sense, the referee's call was wrong and the final play should not have proceeded," the NRL said later in a rather bland press release.

The Dragons were so infuriated by the mistake that they asked the league to award them two competition points, despite the official result of the match. That request was slapped down.

Then, last night, a third act was added to the horror show. With North Queensland leading Manly 20-14 in Gosford, and less than 10 minutes left to play, Kieran Foran barged over the line to score the crucial, match-levelling try.

HOWLER THREE: Manly vs. North Queensland

Officials Gavin Badger and Adam Devcich missed two obvious infringements in the build-up. First, Manly fullback Brett Stewart passed the ball about a metre forward. It rebounded off a Cowboy, was picked up by the Sea Eagles, and they restarted the tackle count.

Then, a blatant obstruction by Manly's Jamie Buhrer was inexplicably ignored by video referees Bernard Sutton and Paul Mellor, who awarded Foran's try.

It was a gutsy win from Manly, who went into the match without star half-back Daly Cherry-Evans, and had to come from behind again after Jonathan Thurston kicked a field goal with five minutes left. But without that huge piece of charity from the referees, North Queensland would almost certainly have closed the game out.

Cowboys fans have been complaining about a supposed refereeing conspiracy against their team for several years now. If you couldn't understand why they felt that way after the infamous "seven tackle set" in last season's finals series, you certainly can now.

MORE: Cowboys robbed by seven tackle set

The conspiracy theory doesn't stack up though, because North Queensland isn't the only team being dudded. We've only pointed out the most flagrant examples of refereeing incompetence here. There are smaller incidents in practically every NRL game.

The referees aren't just infuriating hardcore fans anymore. Their mistakes are losing matches. Three teams have been robbed in the last 12 days, and that simply isn't good enough.

What do you think? Comment below, or talk to us on Twitter: @SamClench | @newscomauHQ | #NRLmannql


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Surfing George surprises Royals

Special edition ... Manly Mayor Jean Hay with the Manly Daily and the surfboard gift for Prince George. Source: Supplied

Thousands have crowded the beach to give the Duke and Duchess a warm welcome to Manly.

A PICTURE of baby Prince George surfing a break at Manly beach was probably not the holiday snap the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge were expecting to see as a memento of their trip.

Nipper Prince George ... The Manly Daily front page that Manly Mayor Jean Hay showed to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. Source: Supplied

Manly Mayor Jean Hay showed the Royal couple the Manly Daily's front page from Thursday which had a digitally altered image of George on board a surfboard and in a surf lifesaving cap.

PICTURES: Kate's head-turning looks on tour

The front page image was designed to tie in with the gift of a surfboard from Manly Council and the offer of surfing lessons from former world champions Barton Lynch and Wayne Bartholomew.

PICTURES: Ten awkward royal tour photos

JOY: Family's royal close encounter

NIPPERS: Royals impressed

PRINCE GEORGE: Children's royal fairytale comes true

BLOG: Manly Daily up-to-the minute royal coverage

Cr Hay showed the couple the front page as she presented them with the official gift from Manly, a six-foot surfboard bearing the words 'Greetings from Manly.'

The British Royal Family traditionally issues royal warrants to suppliers of their favoured goods and services.

Honorary nipper ... Manly Mayor Jean Hay shows the Manly Daily cover with a digitally altered image of Prince George. Source: Getty Images

Current warrant holders include Gordon's Gin, Fortnum & Mason and the Ritz Hotel.

Welcome to Manly ... The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are presented with the surfboard by Manly Mayor Jean Hay and Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Source: Getty Images

Only the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh and the Prince of Wales can issue warrants.

Who knows if the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge make a recommendation the Daily will be added to their list.


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Rescued vice-principal found dead

Divers have battled currents and murky waters to finally enter a South Korean ferry two days after it sank.

Cellphone video emerged from the South Korean ferry disaster on Thursday, as the president of the company that runs the ferry appeared for an emotional public apology. Via The Foreign Bureau, WSJ's global news update.

Grief-stricken ... South Korean relatives of passengers on board a capsized ferry cry as they wait for news about their loved ones. Source: AFP

A SCHOOL vice-principal who was rescued from the sunken South Korea ferry has been found dead as an arrest warrant is issued for the boat's captain.

Kang Min-Kyu, 52, had escaped the 6825-tonne Sewol ferry as it sank on Wednesday with hundreds of his students still on board and was taken with other survivors to nearby Jindo island.

Jindo police said the cause of death was under investigation and Yonhap news agency reported that Kang had felt guilty for being alive while many of those under his care were missing.

PASSENGER FILM: The moments before the South Korean ferry sank

The new tragedy came as prosecutors sought arrest warrants.

"The joint investigation team of police and prosecutors asked for warrants to arrest three crew, including the captain," the official in the southern coastguard headquarters in Mokpo told AFP.

The request was submitted to the local court, he said, while adding that he was unaware of the precise charges.

CAPTAIN ABANDONED SHIP: "I'm sorry, I'm deeply ashamed"

Arrest warrant ... Lee Joon-Seok, captain of the South Korean ferry that capsized at sea off the coast of Jindo, is interviewed at Mokpo police station in Mokpo. Source: AFP

The captain Lee Joon-Seok and most of his 28 crew managed to escape the ferry, and have been criticised for abandoning the ship when so many were still trapped on board.

Tracking data from the Maritime Ministry showed the ferry made a sharp turn just before sending its first distress signal on Wednesday morning.

Some experts believe such a tight turn could have dislodged the heavy cargo manifest — including more than 150 vehicles — and destabilised the vessel, causing it to list heavily and then capsize.

But others suggested the turn might have been caused by a collision with a rock or other submerged object.

Prosecutors said earlier today that preliminary investigations showed that the captain had handed the helm to his third officer before the ferry capsized.

Lee apologised yesterday to the victims and their relatives, but offered no clear explanation for what caused the ship to go down.

"I feel really sorry for the passengers, victims and families," Lee said.

"I feel ashamed."

The lucky ones ... South Korea Coast Guard members in helicopters try to rescue some of the 477 passengers and crew aboard. Source: AFP

The confirmed death toll stands at 28, with the focus of concern remaining on the 268 still unaccounted for, many of them students from Ansan Danwon High School.

Of the 475 people on board when the Sewol capsized, only 179 were rescued and no new survivors have been found.

With the chances of their survival becoming slimmer with each passing hour, the sinking is shaping to be one of South Korea's worst disasters, made all the more heartbreaking by the likely loss of so many young people, aged 16 or 17.

The ship had left the north-western port of Incheon on Tuesday on an overnight journey to the holiday island of Jeju in the south with 475 people, including 325 students. It capsized within hours of the crew making a distress call to the shore at 9am, with only the dark blue keel jutting out over the surface.

Even that had disappeared by late today and rescuers floated two giant beige coloured buoys to mark the area. Navy divers attached underwater lifting bags to the ferry to prevent it from sinking further, the Defence Ministry said.

Coast guard officials said divers began pumping air into the ship in an attempt to sustain any survivors.

On the shore of a nearby island, angry and bewildered relatives watched the rescue attempts. Some held a Buddhist prayer ritual, crying and praying for their relatives' safe return.

"I want to jump into the water with them," said Park Geum-san, 59, the great-aunt of another missing student, Park Ye-ji. "My loved one is under the water and it's raining. Anger is not enough."

A six-year-old girl is rescued from the sunken ferry in South Korea, but her parents and brother are still missing. Sarah Toms reports.

South Korean officials offered some information about what may have led to the sinking. They said the accident happened at a point where the ferry had to make a turn. Prosecutor Park Jae-eok said in a briefing that investigators were looking at whether the third mate ordered a turn whose angle was so sharp that it caused the ship to list.

Yonhap news agency reported that the third mate was a 26-year-old with a year of experience steering ships and five months on the Sewol.

The ship made a sharp turn between 8:48am and 8:49am local time, but it's not known whether the turn was made voluntarily or because of some external factor, Nam Jae-heon, a director for public relations at the Maritime Ministry, said today.

Another angle being probed was the captain's role in the disaster.

A transcript of a ship-to-shore exchange and interviews by The Associated Press showed the captain delayed the evacuation for half an hour after a South Korean transportation official told the ship it might have to evacuate.

The recommendation by an unidentified official at the Jeju Vessel Traffic Services Centre came at 9am, just five minutes after a distress call by the Sewol.

No survivors likely now ... The South Korean ferry sinking on its way to Jeju island from Incheon, some 20 kilometres off the island of Byungpoong in Jindo. Source: AFP

In the recording of the conversation, the Sewol crew member says: "Currently the body of the ship has listed to the left. The containers have listed as well."

The Jeju VTS officer responds: "OK. Any loss of human life or injuries?"

The ship's answer is: "It's impossible to check right now. The body of the ship has tilted, and it's impossible to move."

The VTS officer then says "Yes, OK. Please wear life jackets and prepare as the people might have to abandon ship."

"It's hard for people to move," replies the crew member on the radio.

Oh Yong-seok, a helmsman on the ferry, told the AP that the first instructions from the captain were for passengers to put on life jackets and stay where they were, Oh said.

About 30 minutes later, the captain finally gave the order to evacuate, Oh said, adding that he wasn't sure in the confusion and chaos on the bridge if the order was relayed to the passengers. Several survivors told the AP that they never heard any evacuation order.

Grief-stricken ... A woman weeps at a gymnasium used as a gathering point for relatives of missing passengers. Source: AFP

Of the 29 crew members, 20, including the captain, survived, the coast guard said. Officials were investigating whether Lee got on one of the first rescue boats.

Lee has made a brief, videotaped appearance, although his face was hidden by a grey hoodie. "I am really sorry and deeply ashamed," Lee said. "I don't know what to say."

Park, the prosecutor, also said crews' testimonies differed about where the captain was when the ship started listing. As that listing continued, the captain was "near" the bridge, Park said, but he couldn't say exactly where.

Today, strong currents and rain made rescue attempts difficult. Divers worked in shifts to try to get into the sunken vessel, where most of the missing passengers are thought to be trapped, said coast guard spokesman Kim Jae-in.

Three vessels with cranes arrived at the site to possibly begin salvaging the ferry. But they will not hoist the ship before getting approval from family members of those believed trapped inside because the lifting could endanger any survivors, said a coast guard officer, speaking on condition of anonymity, citing department rules.

The school vice principal found hanging Friday was identified as Kang Min-kyu, the lead guide for the school trip. No suicide note was found near the site, but Yonhap news agency reported that Kang had felt guilty for being alive while many of those under his care were missing.

Also today, prosecutors raided the offices of the ship's owner, Chonghaejin Marine Co. Ltd, in Incheon.

The operator of the ferry added more cabin rooms to three floors after its 2012 purchase the ship, which was built in Japan in 1994, an official at the private Korean Register of Shipping told the AP today.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person was not allowed to discuss matters under investigation, said the extension work between October 2012 and February 2013 increased the Sewol's weight by 187 tons and added enough room for 117 more people. The Sewol had a capacity of 921 when it sank.

Hopeless task ... South Korean Navy personnel try to search for missing passengers aboard the sunken ferry Sewol in the water off the southern coast near Jindo, South Korea. Source: AP

As is common in South Korea, the ship's owner, Chonghaejin Marine Co. Ltd, paid for a safety check by the Korean Register of Shipping, the official said, which found that the Sewol passed all safety tests, including whether the ship could stabilise in the event of tilting to the right or to the left after adding more weight.

Ian Winkle, a British naval architect and ferry expert, said many ships have such modifications, to increase capacity, for instance.

The last major ferry disaster in South Korea was in 1993, when 292 people were killed.

* Readers seeking support and information about suicide prevention can contact Lifeline on 13 11 14


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The world’s most haunted island up for sale

Poveglia, the most haunted island on Earth. Source: Twitter

ONCE a dumping ground for victims of the plague and the former site of a mental hospital, this Italian island is said to be haunted by tens of thousands of tormented spirits.

And now it could be yours.

Room with a view ... a haunted room, that is. Source: Facebook

Remnants of the former hospital and quarantine. Source: Facebook

Poveglia is a seven hectare uninhabited island off the coast of Italy and it's being put up for sale by the Italian government to help reduce national debt.

But with a chilling and disturbing history they could be hard pressed to find a buyer.

Overrun with weeds ... and spectres. Source: Facebook

The mental hospital was the site of lobotomies. Source: Facebook

Located on the Venice Lagoon, the island swirls with horrific tales including rumours that people were burned and buried there during the plague, that the soil is 50 per cent human ash and that the psychiatrist who ran the mental hospital was a butcher and torturer.

The abandoned chapel. Source: Facebook

Now littered with abandoned buildings and overrun with weeds, the island has always been the site of controversy.

The Genoese and Venetians fought over it in the 14th century and victims of the plague were sent there to die. It was used as a quarantine station in the 18th century and was most recently the site of a sinister mental hospital.

Tormented spirits are said to haunt its walls. Source: Facebook

It is said about 160,000 bodies were dumped on the island when the Bubonic plague hit Italy and that thousands of tortured spirits haunt its shores.

The crumbling chapel. Source: Facebook

Work crews even uncovered a grave pit filled with the remains of more than 1,500 plague victims.

Thousands of skeletons were uncovered in mass graves. Source: Facebook

Skeletons of the plague. Source: Facebook

In 1922 the island became home to a mental hospital with reports that the deranged doctor experimented on patients with lobotomies using hand drills, chisels and hammers. He later threw himself off the bell tower claiming to be driven mad by ghosts of his victims.

The psychiatrist threw himself off this bell tower. Source: Facebook

With a past so sinister, no tourist has been allowed to step foot on the island. But the Italian government is now hoping the site can be taken over by a luxury hotel and are offering a 99 year lease for its redevelopment.

The old hospital has a sinister past. Source: Facebook


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The lawyers inside murder trial of the century

Oscar Pistorius has finished his gruelling five day testimony on the witness stand, reading a poem from a Valentines Day card his former girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp had prepared for him the day she was killed.

BOOM. Welcome to Nel town. Source: Getty Images

IT'S the legal equivalent of a bout between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier. Two talented, brutal attorneys at the peak of their powers, fighting each other for the heavyweight title before an audience of millions.

Prosecutor Gerrie Nel and defence lawyer Barry Roux are the men driving Oscar Pistorius's murder trial. They're two of the most feared lawyers in South Africa, having built successful careers in parallel over the past three decades.

MORE: Reeva's Valentine's Day card to Oscar

Nel has been prosecuting alleged criminals for more than 30 years. Roux has been defending them for 31. Both men have drawn upon that experience to eviscerate witnesses in the Pistorius case.

MORE: Pistorius accused of faking tears

So, how do South Africa's heavyweight lawyers stack up against each other? Are they really so evenly matched?

That's Nel on the left, and Roux on the right. Source: AP

GERRIE NEL

History

The biggest triumph of Nel's career was his successful prosecution of former police chief and Interpol president Jackie Selebi.

It was a confronting case for South Africans, who were forced to admit the man leading their nation's fight against crime was a criminal himself. Selebi was convicted of corruption (he overlooked drug trafficking in return for bribes), and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

The Selebi case was a trial in more ways than one for Nel. In January of 2008, 20 police officers stormed into the lawyer's home and arrested him, in front of his wife and children, for "fraud". The charge turned out to be nonsense. It was an intimidation tactic, meant to disrupt his investigation into Selebi.

Nel refused to back down. That sums up the man pretty well.

He also served as the head of an official crime-fighting agency whose operatives were called "The Scorpions". They investigated organised crime and corruption between 2001 and 2008.

Within three years of being founded, The Scorpions had prosecuted 380 cases with a conviction rate of 93 per cent, the Mirror reports. They even raided the home of South Africa's then-Deputy President Jacob Zuma.

You get the idea. Nel has been a determined, wildly successful prosecutor for years.

He cross-examines like a street-fighter. Source: Getty Images

Style

Within the legal community, Nel is known as "the pit bull". That's because he cross-examines witnesses with unrivalled aggression.

"He likes to rattle witnesses. To emotionally rattle them to see if he can get them to give him contradicting versions. That is his style," says South African defence attorney Ulrich Roux.

"He's definitely the best prosecutor in South Africa. He's proved that, and I think he will continue to prove that."

Nel's relentless and confrontational style was best demonstrated in the Selebi trial. He called the former Interpol president an "arrogant liar", and kept him on the stand for two weeks.

He's not scared of controversy either. A week ago, he shocked onlookers in court by displaying a graphic image of Reeva Steenkamp's fatal head wound and comparing it to a watermelon, with Oscar Pistorius on the stand.

It was a ruthless tactic, but according to Nel, it was absolutely necessary.

Raise your hand if you're a tough prosecutor. Source: Getty Images

Best moment so far

Nel's five-day cross-examination of Pistorius could end up being decisive. He forced the athlete to contradict his own testimony several times (Pistorius claimed those "mistakes" were due to tiredness), and more than once reduced him to an emotional wreck.

The most telling moment came when Nel pointed out Steenkamp's position behind the toilet door. She was standing up against the door, facing it, when Pistorius shot her. Nel used that evidence to suggest the pair were talking to each other before Pistorius pulled the trigger.

Best parody

Brad O'Regan, a producer for the South African radio station Highveld 94.7, put together this rap tribute to Nel.

"They call me Gerrie Nel, and I am mad as hell, and when I get you on the stand I will make you tell. I don't have no feelings, new lies I'm revealing, I get emotions in the court to hit the ceiling."

It's undeniably catchy.

BARRY ROUX

History

Roux does not focus solely on criminal law. His practice also deals with "insurance, delictual, aviation, matrimonial, medical negligence, general contractual and liquidation work". But he has still featured in some of South Africa's biggest criminal trials, with great success.

Roux represented Scottish businessman Dave King, who was facing a long stint in jail for avoiding a tax bill of 2.3 billion rand. After a marathon 13-year run through the courts, Roux managed to reduce his punishment to a fine of just 700 million rand. King avoided jail altogether.

Another of Roux's high profile tax evasion cases involved a mining magnate called Roger Kebble. The charges in that case were withdrawn altogether.

He never ran a group called The Scorpions, but Roux's career has been just as successful as Nel's. His rumoured salary of up to $A10,000 per day for defending Pistorius is proof enough of that.

Give 'em both barrels, Barry. Source: Getty Images

Style

Roux can be a patronising, exasperated presence in the courtroom. He picks away at witnesses, asking them the same questions repeatedly until they slip up. His style often switches in an instant, from charming and absent-minded to biting and sarcastic.

Daily Mirror writer Lucy Thornton has described Roux as a lawyer who "goes from bumbling poodle to snarling rottweiler in seconds, terrifying witnesses."

His tactics can be devastatingly effective. Roux lulls witnesses into a false sense of security before unleashing direct, piercing questions that prey upon their emotions and reduce them to a state of utter confusion.

Barry gives Oscar some firm legal advice. Source: Getty Images

Best moment so far

Roux's biggest courtroom masterclass actually came during Pistorius's bail hearing, just six days after Steenkamp's death. He completely destroyed the credibility of police detective Hilton Botha, an officer with 24 years of experience.

Botha started the day firmly in the prosecution's corner. By the time Roux was through with him, the detective had conceded that he found nothing at the scene which contradicted Pistorius's version of events.

"I don't have any facts," he admitted at one point.

Nel didn't dare call Botha to the stand during the actual trial. Roux had turned him into a liability, if not a running joke. How's that for a knockout punch?

Best parody

This one comes courtesy of Roger Goode, who hosts a radio show on 5FM. It's a parody of Pharrell's hit Happy. The chorus will be stuck in your head for days.

HEAD TO HEAD

Nel and Roux have clashed in a high profile murder case before. The defendants in that trial were two men called Casper Greeff and Christopher Njeje.

Greeff was accused of hiring Njeje to kill his wife, Estelle, in 1999. Njeje proceeded to cut her throat with a blunt knife.

Nel won the case. Both Greeff and Njeje were found guilty of murder with direct intent and sentenced to life in prison.


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Kate puts wrong foot forward in fashion fail

AN excited crowd has greeted the The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at Sydney's Royal Easter Show.

Duchess Kate preparing to board a helicopter with Prince William to visit the 2013 bushfire affected residents in the town of Winmalee in the Blue Mountains. Source: AFP

THE Duchess of Cambridge was so dazzling in a simple dress by Aussie label Zimermann today that we can probably overlook a minor wardrobe fail this afternoon.

We know there are few opportunities to go to the beach back home, but what were you thinking, Duchess?

Please remove shoes from feet, then walk on the beach. So awkward.

Someone get the lady a pair of pluggers, would you? Source: AFP

The well-heeled Duchess Kate and Prince William were at Manly Beach in Sydney this afternoon for a demonstration by the local surf club.

And there was a bit of a fuss on social media about the un-Australian choice of footwear.

That hair though. Flawless as always. Source: Getty Images

Could the formal footwear look any more out-of-place? Source: Getty Images

We can assume these youngsters were more polite than us and didn't say a word about the shoes. Source: Getty Images

Earlier, the Royals continued their royal Aussie tour with a visit to the Royal Easter Show in Sydney.

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge arrived at the showground in Homebush, and social media quickly went into overdrive at the sight of Kate's dress choice for the outing.

The stylish royal opted for a cream lace dress by Australian fashion label Zimmermann and teamed it with a pair of tan wedges and a simple clutch.

It is the first Aussie designer she has worn since arriving Down Under.

Kate Middleton arrives at the Sydney Easter Show wearing a dress by Aussie label Zimmermann. Source: INF

The Roamer Day Dress is from the upcoming Summer Swim 2014 range and retails for $495.

ROYAL WATCH: Kate wows in wattle-coloured frock

It was due to arrive in stores worldwide this June but the release date has been moved forward in response to overwhelming demand.

Within minutes the Zimmermann website was struggling as online buyers rushed to snap up the garment. No doubt Sydney sisters Nicole and Simone Zimmermann will be thrilled.

Actress Naomi Watts modelled the sleeved dress in Zimmermann's upcoming campaign.

Naomi Watts wearing the Zimmermann Roamer Day Dress. Source: Supplied

Kate Middleton arrives at the Royal Easter Show. Source: News Corp Australia

The royal pair took in the sheep shearing and wool handling, met the 2013 Wool4Skool program winner — who designed a dress for the Duchess of Cambridge — and signed the visitors book.

It's unclear whether they had time to sample a Dagwood Dog before departing.

Wills and Kate visit Fred, a super fine wool Merino from Wellington. Source: News Corp Australia

Kate meets a young fan on her visit to the Sydney Royal Easter Show. Source: News Corp Australia

Prince William and Kate watch a shearing demonstration at the Sydney Royal Easter Show. Source: Getty Images

This afternoon they traded the show bags and rides for a visit to Manly's Bear Cottage palliative care hospice, where they met young patients, families, volunteers and staff.

The Duchess sings with the children. Source: Getty Images

Speaking with a patient. Source: Getty Images

Prince William at Manly's Bear Cottage. Source: Getty Images

Sydneysiders were able to catch a glimpse of the royals when they visited Manly beach and watched Surf Lifesaving activities on the sand.

Prince George was left behind at Admiralty House with his nanny while his mum and dad tour around Sydney. Our next scheduled sighting of the royal bub won't be until his visits Taronga Zoo on Sunday.

The Duchess of Cambridge and Prince George arrive at Sydney Airport on April 16, 2014. Source: Getty Images

Over 200,000 excited fans arrived at the showground to catch a glimpse of the couple who spent the day yesterday talking with fire fighters and local residents of the Blue Mountains.


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Rapper’s penis reattach fails

Penis reattachment failed ... Andre Johnson, a rapper affiliated with Wu-Tang Clan, cut off his penis and then jumped off a second storey balcony, critically injuring herself. Source: Supplied

A suicide attempt goes from bad to worse. Courtesy: Fox News

SURGEONS have been unable to reattach the penis to a rapper who cut it off before jumping off a building.

Andre Johnson, who raps under the name Christ Bearer and is affiliated with the famous Wu-Tang Clan, cut off his penis before jumping from the second-storey of a building in North Hollywood.

ANDRE JOHNSON: Rapper treated after severing his penis

Johnson was taken to Cedars-Sinai Medical Centre in Los Angeles in a critical condition. His severed penis was taken to the hospital a short time later where surgeons tried without success to reattach it, website TMZ reported.

Discovered by Wu-Tang Clan member RZA ... Rapper Andre Johnson is known by the name Christ Bearer. Source: Supplied

Johnson belonged to a group Northstar, which was discovered by Wu-Tang Clan member RZA in 1998. The producer backed the duo for their 2004 debut album "RZA Presents Northstar."

"Northstar were signed to Wu-Tang productions 10 years ago and were part of the West Coast Killa Bees — young guys that RZA tried to help to give an opportunity to take off the streets and make something of themselves," Wu-Tang Clan representative Heathcliff Berru told E! News.

"They had lyrical talent and freestyle and RZA strived to give them a shot. RZA has been doing this his whole career. He worked with them as he does with countless other artists. Artists and producers collaborate all the time.

"What Christ Bearer did was unfathomable. I feel for his family at this time."

EXPERIENCING EMOTIONAL DIFFICULTIES

Lifeline 13 11 14

Beyond Blue 1300 224 636

Youth Beyond Blue


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NRL referees’ disgraceful record

North Queensland star Jonathan Thurston wasn't happy with the referees last night. Source: AAP

THE NRL's incompetent referees have managed to rob three teams of victory in just 12 days.

The disgraceful run of howlers started in Melbourne on April 6, when the Gold Coast Titans were awarded a matchwinning penalty in the final minute of play against the Storm.

HOWLER ONE: Melbourne vs. Gold Coast

Titans prop Luke Douglas dropped the ball cold in a three-man tackle, but officials Ben Cummins and Brett Suttor ruled that it had been stripped out.

"I know it's a Storm crowd, but I think most people would be reasonably upset with that penalty," Melbourne coach Craig Bellamy said after the match. He doesn't usually have such a talent for understatement.

It hasn't been all bad for the Storm though. Bellamy's players benefited from another ridiculous error five days ago, when they were allowed to play on after full-time to steal victory from the Dragons. This time, the lead referee was Matt Cecchin.

HOWLER TWO: Melbourne vs. St George Illawarra

"Technically, the siren sounded a split second before the Melbourne player 'heeled' the ball. So, in that sense, the referee's call was wrong and the final play should not have proceeded," the NRL said later in a rather bland press release.

The Dragons were so infuriated by the mistake that they asked the league to award them two competition points, despite the official result of the match. That request was slapped down.

Then, last night, a third act was added to the horror show. With North Queensland leading Manly 20-14 in Gosford, and less than 10 minutes left to play, Kieran Foran barged over the line to score the crucial, match-levelling try.

HOWLER THREE: Manly vs. North Queensland

Officials Gavin Badger and Adam Devcich missed two obvious infringements in the build-up. First, Manly fullback Brett Stewart passed the ball about a metre forward. It rebounded off a Cowboy, was picked up by the Sea Eagles, and they restarted the tackle count.

Then, a blatant obstruction by Manly's Jamie Buhrer was inexplicably ignored by video referees Bernard Sutton and Paul Mellor, who awarded Foran's try.

It was a gutsy win from Manly, who went into the match without star half-back Daly Cherry-Evans, and had to come from behind again after Jonathan Thurston kicked a field goal with five minutes left. But without that huge piece of charity from the referees, North Queensland would almost certainly have closed the game out.

Cowboys fans have been complaining about a supposed refereeing conspiracy against their team for several years now. If you couldn't understand why they felt that way after the infamous "seven tackle set" in last season's finals series, you certainly can now.

MORE: Cowboys robbed by seven tackle set

The conspiracy theory doesn't stack up though, because North Queensland isn't the only team being dudded. We've only pointed out the most flagrant examples of refereeing incompetence here. There are smaller incidents in practically every NRL game.

The referees aren't just infuriating hardcore fans anymore. Their mistakes are losing matches. Three teams have been robbed in the last 12 days, and that simply isn't good enough.

What do you think? Comment below, or talk to us on Twitter: @SamClench | @newscomauHQ | #NRLmannql


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14 everyday habits of healthy people

Burgers and chips are fine, in moderation. Source: News Limited

THERE is a fine line between thinking carefully about what we put into our bodies and obsessing over it or restricting it dangerously.

Whether our particular issue is emotional eating, binge eating, disordered eating or we just can't seem to get a handle on the whole nutrition thing, we can all stand to learn a few things from the people for whom healthy eating just comes easily. Here are a few of the things they do differently.

1. People with a healthy relationship to food eat mindfully.

Our body has some pretty significant built-in cues to tell us when to eat -- and when to stop eating. But we're not always listening. The practice of engaging all of our senses to guide our eating-related decisions is called mindful eating, explains Megrette Fletcher, co-founder and current president of the Center for Mindful Eating. Mindful eating can help us "acknowledge our response to food without getting into judgment," she says.

2. They swear by everything -- yes, everything -- in moderation.

"No food is forbidden," says Edward Abramson, Ph.D. a clinical psychologist and author of Emotional Eating. "Foods are not intrinsically 'good' or 'bad.'" He tells an anecdote of a client who once told him French fries were the work of the devil -- and it was not a joke. "French fries are just French fries," he says.

Morality attached to food may stem from the fact that some religions do have prohibitions when it comes to food, he says. Take, for example, how "some foods are described as sinfully delicious," he says.

"It isn't food that's good or bad, it's our experience," says Fletcher. "And that's not judging, it's categorising." Recognising foods and eating situations that you find pleasant can help inform your future choices, she says. People with a healthy relationship to food tell themselves, "'Eating is a chance for me to nourish and nurture my being,'" she says, "as opposed to, 'I have to eat this way or those foods.'"

You don't have to say no to the things you love, like these prawns! Source: ThinkStock

3. But they know the timing has to be right.

However, if you do decide you're in the mood for fries or pizza or chocolate, says Abramson, enjoy your pick at a time when you're not hungry for a full meal, so you don't overdo it. "If you're starving and then you're confronted with a favourite food, you'll consume a lot more of it," he says. "Let's say, if you have it for dessert, you already had your meal, your tummy is full, you can really appreciate the sensations that chocolate provides."

4. They eat when they're physically hungry.

"Emotional eating is typically to soothe unpleasant emotional arousal," says Abramson. Unfortunately, stress and anxiety often cause us to crave higher-calorie, fattier foods and "most of us don't need additional caloric intake," he says.

When we use food to try to soothe an emotion, he adds, we mask what that emotion is trying to teach us, and instead replace it with regret or guilt for eating whatever we grabbed.

5. And they stop eating when they're comfortably full.

Hunger and satiety both start off small and grow bigger and louder, says Fletcher. "Some of us don't hear hunger or fullness until it's screaming in our ears," she says. But being more tuned-in while eating can help us "hear" better as well. "Mindfulness is saying, 'I'm going to listen harder to my hunger and hear it when it's not yelling at me, and I'm going to listen harder to my fullness so it's not yelling at me [either].'" Both hunger and fullness change after every bite, so listening in can help you find the level of fullness where it's comfortable for you to stop eating, she says.

Nuts, grains and fruit are great for breakfast. Source: Supplied

6. They eat breakfast.

Regular breakfast eaters have more energy, better memories and lower cholesterol. They also feel healthier overall and are typically leaner than their peers who don't eat a morning meal. "Starting your day with a healthy, balanced breakfast with proteins, fats and carbs and not high in sugar is the key to healthy eating," says Marjorie Nolan Cohn, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics and the co-author of Overcoming Binge Eating For Dummies.

7. They don't keep problematic foods in the house.

Once you know your specific patterns of emotional eating, says Abramson, you can take small steps to redirect them. One strategy he recommends is no longer keeping a particularly tempting food in the house, so you'd have to leave home after dinner to get a taste. If, for example, you really love ice cream, "rather than having it sitting in the freezer calling your name," he says, a couple of times a week, go out for ice cream.

8. They don't sit down with the whole bag.

Hitting up your local ice cream shop also has the benefit of providing your treat in a single serving size. "If you have a cup or a cone you know when you're finished, as opposed to sitting there having one spoonful after another" straight out of the carton, says Abramson. Buying single-serving packages of your favourite chips or cookies can also help, he says, as can simply serving yourself in a cup or bowl rather than sitting down with a whole family-size bag of chips.

9. They know the difference between a snack and a treat.

Letting yourself get too hungry is a recipe for overeating -- especially those foods you most want to keep to smaller portions. Snacking is a smart way to make sure you're not ravenous come dinnertime. But snack choice is crucial to both keeping you full and keeping your healthy eating plans on track, says Abramson. "A treat is purely for enjoyment, while a snack is something you eat between meals to stave off hunger," he says. "Nuts or fruit or cheese could be a good snack," he says, but chocolate? A treat.

Nothing like a stir fry to share with friends. Source: ThinkStock

10. They give themselves permission to enjoy eating.

These tips aren't plausible if we don't make time to value our relationships with food. "So many times we forget to take the time to eat, and eating does take time," says Fletcher. She suggests looking ahead at your day and making sure you have enough time carved out to eat, rather than planning to scarf something down in the three minutes you have between afternoon meetings. "We make it three minutes, and that may feed you, but does it nourish you?" she asks. And it's not about feeling guilty for missing something else by making time to eat, she says. It's about truly believing we are "worth sitting down and eating food."

11. They don't "make up" for a meal.

When we find ourselves feeling guilty about a food choice, "there's this instinct to make up for it by either overdoing it at the gym or being very restrictive at the next meal," says Cohn. Instead, she suggests thinking of this process as a more subtle "balancing out". People with healthy relationships to food will have a lighter meal later in the day if they decide to indulge at brunch, for example, but they won't restrict that later meal so much so that they end up binging later because they've made themselves excessively hungry. "You can balance out slowly over the course of a week, but you can't make up within the same day," says Cohn.

If you're feeling guilty about a meal, you may as well eat something else. Source: ThinkStock

12. They don't eat to see the scale shift.

Ideally, we'd all eat what makes us feel good, says Cohn. We'd pick the foods that gave us energy to fuel our daily activity, and we'd avoid foods that, say, gave us indigestion, regardless of how good they tasted, rather than restructuring our eating plans to make the number on the scale change.

1 3. They're not afraid of feeling hungry.

One of the most restrictive patterns of thought that Cohn sees among clients is a fear of eating too much and consequently gaining weight. "People who have a sense of what their body needs and eat mindfully and intuitively when they can, they're not as afraid of their hunger," she says. "What's there to be afraid of? If you get hungry, you just eat something!"

14. Their concerns for food don't interfere with daily life.

After a long list of rules and habits like the above, even the healthiest eaters might feel a little overwhelmed. The key to taking in all this advice healthfully is remaining balanced. Being too rigid, restrictive or strict about nutritious eating can also cause problems, including disordered thoughts or behaviour that could be classified as orthorexia, says Cohn. Scheduling a date with the gym is one thing; scheduling a date three evenings in a row when your best friend is visiting from out of town and you don't make any time to see her may raise red flags, she says. "If you're missing out on normal social engagements or sleep in order to maintain a certain lifestyle, that's definitely crossing the line."

This story has been republished with permission from the Huffington Post.


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